Air Duct Cleaing and Indoor Air Quality

Indoor Air Quality

       Indoor air pollution comes from a variety of sources. Virtually everything in the indoor environment releases particles and/or gases.  Cleaning methods such as sweeping, dusting and vacuuming normally remove larger particles of debris, but often increase the airborne concentrations of smaller particles. Cigarette smoke, cooking residues, pet dander, gas and oil burning furnaces also increase particles and gases. Some of this matter is drawn into the conveyance system and in time, accumulate in ductwork.

Should You Clean Your Air Ducts?

       The simple answer is it depends.  Why would it depend? Air duct cleaning has not necessarily been proven to prevent any health related concerns, but according to the National Air Duct Cleaners Association (NADCA) if “your ducts look dirty, they probably are dirty.”

       Determining if your air ducts need to be cleaned is easier than one thinks.  According to the EPA, you should consider having your ducts cleaned if there is visible mold growth on your ductwork, if the ductwork is contaminated with vermin or if the ducts are clogged with dust or debris particles.  Most contaminates are caught in the filters within the system.
How Can Servpro help?

       The cleaning systems that we have in our arsenal utilize a powerful push/pull air delivery system. A sophisticated vacuum specifically designed for air duct cleaning is connected to the main truck lines of your ductwork. This vacuum system draws the air, while compressed air, various brushes and a special auger which adapts to duct shape, travels through the ductwork, dislodging and pushing the debris toward the vacuum.  The debris is collected in a container, utilizing a 3-stage HEPA Filtration system.

       Servpro of Newtown and Southern Litchfield County also offer free duct cleaning estimates.  We also recommend cleaning Air Duct Systems every 5-10 years depending on certain factors such as fire/smoke damage, smoking, allergies, etc.

       For more information go to http://www.epa.gov/iaq/ia-intro.html.
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